Top 100 Famous Quotes


[ Page 5 ]
.
This quote contains photos.
As quoted in Memoirs, correspondence, and private papers of Thomas Jefferson: late president of the United States (1829), pg. 286
Written in a letter to Peter Carr, the quote continues, "...he tells lies without attending to it, and truths without the world's believing him."
  • Comment
  • Add Topic
  • Press CTRL + C to copy code to your clipboard.
    <EMBED>
John Keats
This quote contains photos.
Endymion (1818) Bk. I, l. 1
"From an epic poem by Keats, it continues, "but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing."
  • Comment (2)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Norman Vincent Peale
This quote contains photos.
As quoted in The Greatest Quotations of All-Time (2010) pg. 177
Attributed to Peale, who was a frontrunner in the positive thinking movement.
  • Comment (1)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
.
This quote contains photos.
The Wisdom of Thomas Jefferson (2003) pg. 67
The quote continues, "The idle are the only miserable," and was written to his daughter, Martha Jefferson.
  • Comment
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Benjamin Franklin
This quote contains photos.
Poor Richard's Almanack (July, 1758) pg. 189
The quote continues, "The Morning Daylight appears plainer when you put out your Candle."
  • Comment
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Napoleon Bonaparte
This quote contains photos.
As quoted in The Best Advice Ever Given (2006) pg. 73
Actually an adage attributed to several people, termed Hanlon's Razor.
  • Comment
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Napoleon Hill
This quote contains photos.
As quoted in Self-Motivation Through Risk Taking! : Are You Leading Or Do You Wither with Problems? (2005)
As one of the pioneers of self-empowerment literature, this quote is famously attributed to Hill, though no further specific contextual information is available.
  • Comment (1)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Benjamin Franklin
This quote contains photos.
As quoted in A Dictionary of American proverbs (1992), pg. 662
Originally written in Franklin's yearly foray into proverbs, in a work he titled "Poor Richard's Almanack." The Almanack itself was famous for weather forecasts, bits of wisdom, and wordplay.
  • Comment (1)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Winston Churchill
This quote contains photos.
As quoted in Dictionary of British Politics (2004) pg. 324
Famously quipped by Churchill about Sir Stafford Cripps, who Churchill was forced to work closely with during his time as Prime Minister.
  • Comment
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Henry David Thoreau
This quote contains photos.
A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849)
This famous American author spent two years living in the wilderness at Walden Pond, where he penned some of his most-remembered works. This quote was written in memory of a trip he took with his brother John, who died of tetanus in 1842. The quote continues, "It is an intelligence above language. One imagines endless conversations with his Friend, in which the tongue shall be loosed, and thoughts be spoken without hesitance or end..."
  • Comment (1)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
.
This quote contains photos.
The Jefferson Cyclopedia (1900) pg. 6
Jefferson wrote this to Peter Carr. He wrote this as a rule for action.
  • Comment (1)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
This quote contains photos.
Ecce Homo (1888)
Actually more accurately translated as "What does not kill him, makes him stronger," but is often paraphrased as the quote listed.
  • Comment (6)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Albert Einstein
This quote contains photos.
The Born-Einstein Letters (1971)
The direct quote is "I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice," but Einstein often used variations of this quote and indeed spoke it differently to different parties.
  • Comment (3)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
.
This quote contains photos.
Printers' Ink (December 8, 1921) pg. 96-97
The first recorded use of this adage came in an article by Bernard advocating the use of pictures in advertisement, specifically in this case for use on streetcars.
  • Comment (2)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Lord Byron
This quote contains photos.
Hebrew Melodies (1815)
Byron was notorious for his varied tastes in both women and men. This poem was written about one Mrs. R. Wilmot. (Berry Memoirs, vol. iii. p. 7), about whom little is known. This was not the only poem directed at a woman who Byron did not revisit in later work. Regardless, one cannot discount the simplicity and subsequent beauty of the poem.
  • Comment
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>
Ralph Waldo Emerson
This quote contains photos.
Attributed to Emerson in Promotion of Pharmaceuticals : Issues, Trends, Options (1993) pg 74, and also Thoreau elsewhere, but no instance of the quote can be found before 1990, so the authorship of the quote is disputed.
  • Comment (7)
  • Add Topic
  • <EMBED>


Add this widget to your website!


Popular Current Topics


"The words you need by the people you admire."

Copyright © 2002-2013 Great Quotes.com


Contact