Top 100 Famous Quotes


The following is Great-Quotes user voted list of the most popular Famous Quotes of all time! This voting process included nearly six million users submitting their favorite "Famous Quotes and Sayings". The Top 100 most frequently submitted Famous Quotes were chosen. See what users, such as yourself, have ranked as the "Top 100 Famous Quotes of all Time" (compilation took place in 2011). Obviously there could be a million "Top 100 Famous Quotes" lists but we think that our users really hit it spot on with this compliation. Make sure to read them all since they are all wonderful.

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Blaise Pascal
This quote contains photos.
Provincial Letters: Letter XVI (1656)
Written by Pascal in a letter to "the Reverend Fathers, the Jesuits," about a number of pressing Catholic church matters that were relevant at the time. He identified with a movement called Jansenism that frequently disagreed with the Jesuits.
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Alexander Pope
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An Essay on Criticism (1711)
From a poem by Pope, it continues "There shallow Draughts intoxicate the Brain, And drinking largely sobers us again." Pope was probably speaking here of the dangers of pride in what we think we have been educated on, and how dangerous not knowing enough about a subject can be.
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Benjamin Franklin
This quote contains photos.
Early American proverbs and proverbial phrases (1977) pg. 42
The above quote was a proverbial phrase and was probably not coined directly by Franklin.
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George Washington
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Written in a letter to Letter to Major-General Robert Howe (17 August 1779).
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William Wordsworth
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My Heart Leaps Up When I Behold (1802)
"The poem continues, "I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety."
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Benjamin Franklin
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As quoted in Early American proverbs and proverbial phrases, (1977) pg. 309
A purveyor of proverbs, Franklin wasn't the first to express this sentiment, but he assuredly popularized it.
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Charles Kettering
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Mechanical engineering: Volume 66 (1944)
Kettering spoke often on inventors, as he himself was, and he spoke of the above quote as the "definition" of an inventor.
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Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Society and Solitude (1870)
In the portion of Society and Solitude titled "Civilization," Emerson states the desire to let our dreams and ambitions drive us: to aim high.
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Henry David Thoreau
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Journal (1962) pg. 130
The quote above is preceded by, "I know of no rules whichs holds so true as that." Here Thoreau shows us that our expecations can create a reality.
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Alexander Pope
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An Essay on Criticism (1711) Part III Line 66
The title of the work this is contained in carries the word "Essay," it is in fact a poem that represents the literary ideals of Pope's time. It also nearly expressly addresses other writers rather than the standard "reader."
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Albert Einstein
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As quoted in Albert Einstein, The Human Side: New Glimpses From His Archives (1979) pg. 57
Written in a letter to a student, E. Holzapfel, in 1951.
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George Bernard Shaw
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The Apple Cart (1928), Act I
Spoken by the character Proteus, the Prime Minister in a satirical play about political philosophies. The quote is preceded by, "If you all start quarrelling and scolding and bawling, which is just what he wants you to do, it will end in his having his own way as usual, because one man that has a mind..." The "he" that is referenced here is the King in the play.
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This quote contains photos.
Essays on Freedom and Power (1972)
Written in a letter to Mandell Creighton in 1887, who was a Bishop of the Church of England, but at the time of the letter was a professor at Cambridge.
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This quote contains photos.
Essays, Volume 2 (1899)
The quote continues, explained by Bacon himself, "That is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention."
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Winston Churchill
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The Official Report, House of Commons (5th Series) , 11 November 1947, vol. 444, cc. 206–07
From a speech given by Churchill in the House of Commons in 1947.
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This quote contains photos.
Mozart: A Life (1966) pg. 312
Often misattributed to Mozart, it was actually written in Mozart's souvenir album by Jacquin.
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Benjamin Disraeli
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Henrietta Temple (1837) Book 4 chapter 1
Written in a book about a woman who Disraeli had an affair with (Henrietta Sykes).
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Vince Lombardi
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Run to Win: Vince Lombardi on Coaching and Leadership, (2002) pg. 119
Lombardi frequently spoke proactively, and positively, about success at an individual and team level, as the head coach of a champion football team.
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Albert Schweitzer
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As quoted in Building character: strengthening the heart of good leadership (2007) pg. 49
Here Schweitzer states an ideal he believed in strongly--that we must live our ideals if we want them to influence others.
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Robert Frost
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The Death of the Hired Man (1914)
Here Frost speaks on the definition of Home, through his Poem and his characters: farmer Warren, and his wife Mary.
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Harry S. Truman
This quote contains photos.
According to The Truman Library and others, Truman did not come up with the phrase, though he did popularize it. The idea was in line with his sentiments, and also according to the Truman Library, "Fred M. Canfil, then United States Marshal for the Western District of Missouri and a friend of Mr. Truman, saw a similar sign while visiting the Reformatory and asked the Warden if a sign like it could be made for President Truman." The phrase did come to embody Truman's presidency and life.
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Blaise Pascal
Birth: 1623-06-19 Death: 1662-08-19

"We implore the mercy of God, not that He may leave us at peace in our vices, but that He may deliver us from them"

In addition to being a French philosopher, physicist and mathematician, Blaise Pascal was an inventor and the father of the mechanical adding machine. Pascal also formulated the mathematical theory of probability, which is used today in statistics and actuarial professions. Pascal's theorem, one of the basic formulas in projective geometry, was developed by him when he was just 16. As a writer, Pascal urged acceptance of living a Christian life, using mathematics to assess the likelihood of happiness through religion. His use of logic in his discussions was both original and at the sam…



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